The Royal House lamented male-dominated guest list: But now it has happened again

The Royal House called it ‘a pity’ that they had not invited female hunters to the latest Royal Hunt, which took place in early November.

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Nevertheless, the Crown Prince and his friends did not have female company during the hunt in Gribskov, which Queen Margrethe hosted on Thursday evening.

While both Queen Margrethe, Crown Princess Mary and a number of the hunters’ female companions participated in the subsequent hunting table at Fredensborg Castle, where the day’s prey was inspected, there were again only men on the 19-man long guest list for the hunt before.

Business leaders Fritz H. Schur, Count Christoffer Knuth, Baron Otto Reedtz-Thott and director Peter Aandahl, among others, had participated.

Crown Prince Frederik thanks his friends for a good hunt.

Crown Prince Frederik thanks his friends for a good hunt.
Photo: Jens Nørgaard Larsen / Byrd

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Thursday’s King’s Hunt was the second in a row. The first took place in Gludsted Plantage on November 1, and here several noticed that the list of 25 guests was quite male-dominated. In fact, there was not a single woman among those invited.

“The world does not only consist of men, so when you gather a circle of people under the auspices of the Royal House, I think it is thought-provoking that not a single woman has been invited,” said museum director Jane Sandberg. to BT

“I know lots of women with hunting licenses who would be relevant to invite.”

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Figures from the Danish Hunters’ Association show that 6.7 percent of those who took hunting licenses in the 2019/2020 season were women. Compared to the previous season, it is an increase of 0.2 percent.

A guest poses with his prey.

A guest poses with his prey.
Photo: Jens Nørgaard Larsen / Byrd

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And it also annoyed the Royal House that they had not invited any of these women to the hunt on 1 November.

“It is a pity that there were no female hunters on the hunt this time,” the Royal House’s communications manager, Lene Balleby, told BT

»We are of course aware of the problem, and there has also been female participation in the Royal House’s hunts in the past. We hope this will also be the case in the future. “

But already for the subsequent royal hunt on Thursday night, no women were invited again.

There were no women on the guest list when Crown Prince Frederik on 1 November held a King’s Hunt for the business leaders.

Should Crown Prince Frederik in future invite more women to his Royal Hunting?

Yes: 26%

No: 36%

Do not know: 38%

The women answered:

Yes: 29%

No: 31%

Do not know: 40%

The men answered:

Yes: 22%

No: 42%

Do not know: 36%

The survey is based on interviews with 2,002 representatively selected persons over the age of 18 from the YouGov Panel in the period 5 to 9 November 2021. The sample is representative of gender, age, geography, and voting in the election on 5 June 2019. The maximum uncertainty in the survey is +/- 2.2% (percentage points).

But if you ask the Danes, the Royal House does not necessarily have to change anything.

A survey conducted by YouGov for BT in the wake of the latest Royal Hunting shows that only 26 percent believe that Crown Prince Frederik should in future invite women to his Royal Hunting. 36 percent said no, while 38 percent were unsure.

Among those who are positive towards more female hunters, however, is BT’s royal correspondent Jacob Heinel Jensen. He is particularly concerned that the Crown Prince and Crown Princess have long acted as pioneers on issues such as gender equality, LGBT + and women’s rights.

“It’s true when they say that there have been women on the guest list in the past. You have to give it to them. But I simply think the Royal House has to keep in mind that there should always be women on the guest lists – not just once in a while, “he said in connection with the last royal hunt.

Queen Margrethe and Crown Princess Mary did not go hunting, but received the men before the subsequent table at Fredensborg Castle.

Queen Margrethe and Crown Princess Mary did not go hunting, but received the men before the subsequent table at Fredensborg Castle.
Photo: Jens Nørgaard Larsen / Byrd

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“Otherwise it looks hollow.”

It has not been possible to get a comment from the Royal House on Thursday’s guest list.

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