Review: Fantastic ‘Borgen’ comeback – One thing makes no sense

The ‘castle’ is back, the joy of reunion is great! Now it’s going to be fun to see the reactions, for Adam Price and co. is again out with the teasing stick after the elected representatives of reality.

It is nine years ago that Sidse Babett Knudsen last pulled on the Birgitte Nyborg uniform and gave all of us mortals an entertaining fictional insight into the game of power at Christiansborg.

In this fourth season, director Per Fly has been allowed to take the helm, and the first thing that strikes, after the beautiful pictures from the oil discovery in Greenland, is that he has disappointingly chosen to replace the old iconic intro melody with a hero new.

Pilou Asbæk is unfortunately no longer with us either, but in addition the first episode is a true parade of happy reunions, and it exudes profit when you can, for example, place strong actor names like Lars Mikkelsen, Peter Mygind and Mikael Birkkjær in small extra roles.


Sidse Babett Knudsen is back as Birgitte Nyborg.

Sidse Babett Knudsen is back as Birgitte Nyborg.
Photo: DR

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‘Borgen’ in 2022 looks on the character front to become the women’s struggle.

Birgitte Nyborg is fighting for attention with a new, younger prime minister, journalist Katrine Fønsmark has become head of TV Avisen, and apart from a mischievous Greenlandic foreign minister, the male characters are mostly used as servants.

In this connection, it is interesting that the series’ new prime minister is SO much reminiscent of the real Mette Frederiksen with her Jutlandic dialect and great love for social media.

Many will probably also think of former chief of staff Martin Rossen, as it is made a problem that the prime minister will hire a non-elected person so central to power, and this is how you can find more reflections of reality.


Who does the new prime minister remember?

Who does the new prime minister remember?
Photo: DR

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A lot of things are happening in the premiere episode, and it can be difficult to keep track of who is who and what exactly the oil discovery in Greenland has consequences.

On the other hand, ‘Borgen’ excels at its long line of good acting performances, and especially three of the new faces do well.

Firstly, Mikkel Boe Følsgaard is just always good and a perfect replacement for Pilou Asbæk.

He is clearly placed in the story as the ‘comic’ feature, and it’s nice to have a sympathetic, awkward official on the team who fun keeps his neuroses in check with the help of a hypnotist named aura-Kjeld.


Mikkel Boe Følsgaard is new to 'Borgen'.

Mikkel Boe Følsgaard is new to ‘Borgen’.
Photo: DR

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Simon Bennebjerg also has good chemistry in his interaction with Sidse Babett Knudsen, as the new ministerial secretary, and Magnus Millang is surprisingly good as the new head of department.

It’s hard not to pull on the smiley face when he first shows up wearing a suit and serious mine, but he grows in the role and completes a generally strong foreign ministry.

As I remember ‘Borgen’, the series in the first seasons consisted mainly of big, strong fire speeches from Birgitte Nyborg’s side – and you will not get any of them here in the first episode.

It’s also a little strange that Birgitte Nyborg’s annoyingly saved son briefly mentions that there has been corona, and everyone then lives on as if it does not exist – did Adam Price know last year that all restrictions would be gone now?

On the other hand, it is a huge pleasure that DR has once again turned up the sun in their drama universe, and then it is otherwise just to sit back and see which topics from the real Christiansborg will be taken under love treatment for the next many weeks .

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