BT’s royal correspondent on royal children starting school on Monday: ‘The craziest thing is that it has to happen in the last hours’

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After the Royal House chose to pull the royal children out of the Herluftsholm boarding school, there has been radio silence regarding the future school choice.

And now, less than a week before school starts, the Danes do not yet know where Princess Isabella and Prince Christian will continue their schooling.

According to royal correspondent at BT, Jacob Heinel Jensen, this is an “atypical situation” – but the silence is not without reason, he believes:

“Normally, the royal children’s education is within their private sphere, but after the Herlufsholm case it is difficult to maintain because there has been so much public attention,” says Jacob Heinel Jensen.

Jacob Heinel, BT’s royal correspondent.
Photo: Bax Lindhardt

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“Therefore, you are very careful about when and how you announce the choice about school attendance. It will generate an awful lot of attention, more than ever, because it will be analyzed and commented on, and the Royal Household is interested in the children having as normal a start to school as possible.’

According to the correspondent, there are many things at stake in connection with the future school election.

The Danes have decided to that extent where Princess Isabella and Prince Christian will start after the summer holidays.

And a YouGov survey done for BT shows that the Danes want change.

The majority who have chosen an answer option want Prince Christian and Princess Isabella to attend a public high school in Denmark.

30 percent would prefer that Prince Christian started at a public high school in Denmark, and 32 percent would like Princess Isabella to follow in her older brother’s footsteps and do the same.


Photo from Princess Isabella's confirmation in Fredensborg Castle Church on Saturday 30 April 2022. Crown Prince Frederik, Crown Princess Mary and the children Prince Christian, Princess Isabella, Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine.

Photo from Princess Isabella’s confirmation in Fredensborg Castle Church on Saturday 30 April 2022. Crown Prince Frederik, Crown Princess Mary and the children Prince Christian, Princess Isabella, Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine.
Photo: Bax Lindhardt

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Jacob Heinel Jensen believes that the great attention surrounding school choice is “unfortunate”.

“It must be very strange for the children to be in a situation where the people have an opinion on one’s choice of school. It must be tough. Normally the attitude is that you are a child until you are 18, but in this case the children may have grown up a little too quickly because of the attention. It is unfortunate.’

He predicts that the Royal House is interested in minimizing attention, and therefore will not invite the press to take photos of the first day of school, as has been done in the past.

“They probably want to avoid that commotion and therefore go the more ‘safe way,’ where the press is not welcome. Then you probably choose to send out a photo, just like you did when Prince Christian started at Herluftsholm. I could well imagine that they chose that model,’ says BT’s royal correspondent.


Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary with their eldest son Prince Christian, in front of the boarding school Herlufsholm, where he was pulled out.  Photo: Keld Navntoft, the Royal House

Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary with their eldest son Prince Christian, in front of the boarding school Herlufsholm, where he was pulled out. Photo: Keld Navntoft, the Royal House

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In relation to the choice of school, he believes that anything can happen.

“The craziest thing is that it has to happen in the last hours. And that anything can happen. I suspect that Princess Isabella will continue at Tranegård School and then it will be interesting to see where Prince Christian will go – whether it will be Øregård, Gammel Hellerup, Zahles or something completely different.’

“But no matter what, we’ll be wiser when the week is over. It’s already Monday,’ concludes Jacob Heinel Jensen.

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